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Are you a small business looking to build your brand? Or maybe you’re a non-profit, looking to redesign your website in order to more effectively communicate your mission? Or, are you the marketing director for a multi-million dollar organisation looking to improve customer relations and increase revenues?
Vision Camp has worked with all of thouth above, helping to build websites and implement online marketing plans for organisations of all sizes.

High Quality. Stunning Design. Amazing Results.

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My project

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Graphic Design

Web Site

UI/UX Design

Full Branding

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Graphic Design

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Logo Design

What's a logo?

A logo identifies a business in its simplest form via the use of a mark or icon. A logo is for… identification.

A logo identifies a company or product via the use of a mark, flag, symbol or signature. A logo does not sell the company directly nor rarely does it describe a business. Logo’s derive their meaning from the quality of the thing it symbolises, not the other way around – logos are there to identity, not to explain. In a nutshell, what a logo means is more important than what it looks like.To illustrate this concept, think of logos like people. We prefer to be called by our names – James, Dorothy, John – rather than by the confusing and forgettable description of ourselves such as “the guy who always wears pink and has blonde hair”. In this same way, a logo should not literally describe what the business does but rather, identify the business in a way that is recognisable and memorable.It is also important to note that only after a logo becomes familiar, does it function the way it is intended to do much alike how we much must learn people’s names to identify them.The logo identifies a business or product in its simplest form.

Identity Design

What is identity?

One major role in the ‘brand’ or ‘corporate image’ of a company is its identity.

In most cases, identity design is based around the visual devices used within a company, usually assembled within a set of guidelines. These guidelines that make up an identity usually administer how the identity is applied throughout a variety of mediums, using approved colour palettes, fonts, layouts, measurements and so forth. These guidelines ensure that the identity of the company is kept coherent, which in turn, allows the brand as a whole, to be recognisable.

The identity or ‘image’ of a company is made up of many visual devices :

A Logo (The symbol of the entire identity & brand)

Stationery (Letterhead + business card + envelopes, etc.)

Marketing Collateral (Flyers, brochures, books, websites, etc.)

Products & Packaging (Products sold and the packaging in which they come in)

Apparel Design (Tangible clothing items that are worn by employees)

Signage (Interior & exterior design)

Messages & Actions (Messages conveyed via indirect or direct modes of communication)

Other Communication (Audio, smell, touch, etc.)

Anything visual that represents the business.

All of these things make up an identity and should support the brand as a whole. The logo however, is the corporate identity and brand all wrapped up into one identifiable mark. This mark is the avatar and symbol of the business as a whole.

Brand Design

What is branding?

Branding is certainly not a light topic – whole publications & hundreds of books have been written on the topic, however to put it in a nutshell you could describe a ‘brand’ as an organisation, service or product with a ‘personality’ that is shaped by the perceptions of the audience. On that note, it should also be stated that a designer cannot “make” a brand – only the audience can do this. A designer forms the foundation of the brand.

Many people believe a brand only consists of a few elements – some colours, some fonts, a logo, a slogan and maybe some music added in too. In reality, it is much more complicated than that. You might say that a brand is a ‘corporate image’.

The fundamental idea and core concept behind having a ‘corporate image’ is that everything a company does, everything it owns and everything it produces should reflect the values and aims of the business as a whole.

It is the consistency of this core idea that makes up the company, driving it, showing what it stands for, what it believes in and why they exist. It is not purely some colours, some typefaces, a logo and a slogan.

As an example, let’s look at the well known IT company, Apple. Apple as a company, projects a humanistic corporate culture and a strong corporate ethic, one which is characterised by volunteerism, support of good causes & involvement in the community. These values of the business are evident throughout everything they do, from their innovative products and advertising, right through to their customer service. Apple is an emotionally humanist brand that really connects with people – when people buy or use their products or services; they feel part of the brand, like a tribe even. It is this emotional connection that creates their brand – not purely their products and a bite sized logo.

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Web Site

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E-commerce Website

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What's an E-commerce Website?

An e-commerce website is a website people can directly buy products from. You’ve probably used a number of e-commerce websites before, most big brands and plenty of smaller ones have one. Any website that includes a shopping cart and a way for you to provide credit card information to make a purchase falls into this category.

If you’re setting up a website for your business and plan to sell your products through the site, then this is the type of website you need to build. There are some specific steps you have to be sure to include when building an ecommerce website, like investing in ecommerce software and getting your SSL certificate to ensure your customers can pay securely. And you’ll want to make sure your web design and copy are all crafted with the site’s main goal in mind: making sales.

Ecommerce websites can be an extension of a business you already have, or become something you build a new business around.

Brochure Website

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What's a Brochure Website?

Brochure websites are a simplified form of business websites. For businesses that know they need an online presence, but don’t want to invest a lot into it (maybe you’re confident you’ll continue to get most of your business from other sources), a simple brochure site that includes just a few pages that lay out the basics of what you do and provide contact information may be enough for you.

Brochure sites were more common in the earlier days of the internet when businesses knew they needed a website, but also expected not to be dependent on it for success. Now that the internet is such a big part of how people research and find just about every product and service they need, most businesses recognize that they need something more competitive.

If you have a business and know you don’t need your website to be a marketing tool that brings in new business, you just need something more like an online business card, then a brochure website may do the trick.

Portfolio Website

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What's a Portfolio Website?

Portfolio websites are sites devoted to showing examples of past work. Service providers who want to show potential clients the quality of the work they provide can use a portfolio website to collect some of the best samples of past work they’ve done. This type of website is simpler to build than a business website and more focused on a particular task: collecting work samples.

This type of website is most common for creative professionals and freelancers that are hired based on demonstrated skill and can be a more efficient alternative to a business website that serves a similar focus.

Nonprofit Website

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What's a Nonprofit Website?

In the same way that businesses need websites to be their online presence, nonprofits do as well. A nonprofit website is the easiest way for many potential donors to make donations and will be the first place many people look to learn more about a nonprofit and determine if they want to support it.

If you have or are considering starting a nonprofit, then building a website for your organization is a crucial step in proving your legitimacy and reaching more people. You can use it to promote the projects your organization tackles, encourage followers to take action, and for accepting donations.

Note: To take donations through the website, you’ll have to take some of the same steps that the owners of ecommerce sites do. In particular, make sure you get an SSL certificate to make sure all payments are secure, and set up a merchant account so that you can accept credit card payments.

Educational Website

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What's an Educational Website?

The websites of educational institutions and those offering online courses fall into the category of educational websites. These websites have the primary goal of either providing educational materials to visitors, or providing information on an educational institution to them.

Some educational websites will have advertisements like entertainment and media websites do. Some offer subscription models or educational products for purchase. And some serve as the online presence for an existing institution.

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UI/UX Design

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UI Design

UX Design

What is UI & UX Design?

Design is a broad stream of subjects and isn’t limited to graphic design. When someone says “I’m a designer’, it is not immediately clear what they actually do day to day. There are a numerous pillars of responsibility which together holds design upright.Design related roles exist in a range of domains viz, graphic design, textile design, interior design, fashion design, ceramic design, print design and more. With the relatively recent influx of tech companies focused on creating interfaces for screens, many new design roles have emerged.

UX is User Experience

UX design is a still a relatively new field, with many companies only just waking up to the fact that they need someone on their payroll if they want to succeed in attracting and retaining customers.Part of the confusion might lie in the name: UX design. For many people, the word “design” is associated with creativity, colors and graphics, when really its true definition lies in functionality, as well as the process behind making products that provide a seamless experience for the people who use them.

UI is User Interface

We all know that a plane can be flown from its cockpit. The UX to fly it is there, but the controls are arranged in such a way that it’s not intuitive — it has a complicated UI.Creating a great UI is a challenge, especially because it has to be intuitive.When asked in a research if people like Samsung phones or Apple phones, most people said that they like Apple. Even though both the brands have the same experience of a phone as a product, people largely preferred one over the other, why?

To the question why they like Apple phones better, the response was consistent and immediate: “I find the Apple phone much more intuitive.”

Interviewer’s response: “Interesting — could you give me some specific examples of how it is more intuitive?”

With this question, their glee turns to shock and horror as if to say “Of course, the Apple is more intuitive — how dare you question that!”

From this point, they would struggle to come up with some sort of answer, ranging from “it just is” to “it just works” to “it’s simpler” to “Apple apps have a more consistent look and feel.”

Apple’s UI is embedded in the UX so well, it doesn’t even feel like it’s there. The more seamless the UI, the more intuitive the product feels.

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Branding Design

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Personal Brand

Personal Brand

Otherwise known as individual brand. The brand a person builds around themselves, normally to enhance their career opportunities. Often associated with how people portray and market themselves via media. The jury’s out on whether this should be called a form of brand because whilst it may be a way to add value, it often lacks a business model to commercialize the strategy.

Product Brand

Product Brand

Elevating the perceptions of commodities/goods so that they are associated with ideas and emotions that exceed functional capability. Consumer packaged goods brands (CPG), otherwise known as fast moving consumer goods brands (FMCG), are a specific application.

Service Brand

Service Brand

Similar to product brands, but involves adding perceived value to services. More difficult in some ways than developing a product brand, because the offering itself is less tangible. Useful in areas like professional services. Enables marketers to avoid competing skill vs skill (which is hard to prove and often devolves to a price argument) by associating their brand with emotions. New online models, such as subscription brands, where people pay small amounts for ongoing access to products/services, are rapidly changing the loyalty and technology expectations for both product and service brands – for example, increasingly products come with apps that are integral to the experience and the perceived value.

Corporate Brand

Corporate Brand

Otherwise known as the organizational brand. David Aaker puts it very well: “The corporate brand defines the firm that will deliver and stand behind the offering that the customer will buy and use.” The reassurance that provides for customers comes from the fact that “a corporate brand will potentially have a rich heritage, assets and capabilities, people, values and priorities, a local or global frame of reference, citizenship programs, and a performance record”.

Luxury Brand

Luxury Brand

Prestige brands that deliver social status and endorsement to the consumer. Luxury brands must negotiate the fine line between exclusivity and reality. They do this through quality, association and story. These brands have perfected the delivery of image and aspiration to their markets, yet they remain vulnerable to shifts in perception and consumer confidence and they are under increasing pressure from “affordable luxury” brands. Coach for example struggled with revenues in 2014 because of declining sales growth in China and Japan, two of the world’s key luxury markets.

Other Brand

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Final cost

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Summary

Description Information Quantity Price
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Customer: any professional or natural person capable within the meaning of Articles 1123 and following of the Civil Code, or legal person, who visits the Site subject to these terms and conditions.

Services: https://www.vision.camp makes available to Customers.

Content: All the constituent elements of the information present on the Site, in particular texts – images – videos.

Customer information: Hereinafter referred to as “Information (s)” which correspond to all the personal data that may be held by https://www.vision.camp for the management of your account, the management of the customer relationship and for analytical and statistical purposes.

User: Internet user connecting, using the aforementioned site.

Personal information: “Information that allows, in any form whatsoever, directly or not, the identification of natural persons to which they apply” (Article 4 of Law No. 78-17 of 6 January 1978).The terms “personal data”, “data subject”, “subcontractor” and “sensitive data” have the meaning as defined by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR: No. 2016-679)

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